Drought is Always a Consideration

We continually talk of grazing management, grazing density, plant diversity and countless other issues to improve our grazing resources. Hopefully resulting in better grazing conditions and above all a healthier ecosystem that provides benefits not only to the ranching community, but the urban public that is finding improving rangeland conditions are beneficial to all, even those that reside in high population areas.

For those rangelands west of the 100th meridian, perhaps the greatest challenge of grazing management is preparing for the next drought which is looming ‘just around the corner’. When the grazing manager finds or understands that preparation for drought is no different than improving his rangeland during wet or what some call normal rainfall conditions. (In my area of ranching normal is dry or drought conditions. In the last 55 years observing rainfall conditions, I estimate that we have survived over 9 to 10 droughty related times. Some more prolonged and severe than others, from 6 months to 3 years. Perhaps better said an extended dry spell averaging every 5 to 7 years.) Those rangelands that have been managed under the influence of a properly applied grazing-recovery from grazing program, during the good years, always come through the extended dry spells in better condition than those lands that are “Used to the fullest” during the wet spells, and not given the opportunity to recover and build soil health.

In short, well managed lands are less prone to the devastating effects of drought than those lands that are taken advantage of during good growing conditions. The opportunity to provide a dependable income for the rancher’s family is greatly enhanced when drought is no longer an ongoing part of the operation. (Or at least the severity of it.) Reduction of livestock numbers at drought initiated low prices and purchasing-feeding high-cost drought feed are both huge when calculating ranch profitability.

The below picture is of Southwestern Bristle Grass a plant that I did not know existed a few years back. Somewhat similar the Plains Bristle Grass, it has a much wider leaf and appears to be much more drought tolerant and palatable than its cousin. Cattle will take a bite of it just about every time, even when passing up the Plains Bristle. It is increasing in coverage at a rapid rate and ultimately may be one of our better grasses. Thanks to grazing program utilizing the REST-GRAZE-REST-GRAZE formula.

May be an image of grass and nature
Photo provided by Ward Whitworth

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