Weeds Have Used All of the Moisture?

Most ranchers have heard that statement and most likely have made the statement themselves, that “The weeds have taken all of the moisture and there is none left for the grass.” Those annual weeds are shallow rooted annuals and have no effect on deep moisture stored in healthy soils. Of course, without deep rooted grasses and forbs, the root systems channels created by older decaying roots, shading of the soil created by the dense cover and ground litter on the surface, the soil has no way of holding the moisture to allow it to soak up the rains. (Nature is continually working to create a rangeland without bare ground. It is up to the rangeland manager to assist her in this endeavor.) As a rule, heavy cover of annual weeds is found on areas that were bare soil prior to their germination and without their presence the available soil moisture would possibly be less because of evaporation.

After being blessed with, soaking, highly effective late summer and fall rains last year, ranchers across the area are experiencing phenomenal spring growth of both winter annuals and -provided grazing management practices were in place-cool season perennials. The temptation is great to deviate from the grazing plan and leave the livestock on those areas that are producing the bulk of that ‘not long lived’ flush of growth. Yes, it will not be long until that ‘spring green’ will be gone and it seems illogical to let it ‘go to waste’ and some adjustment might be in order to utilize this ‘temporary’ feed. (Remember that the grazing animal doesn’t differentiate from annual and perennial plants, it only eats what it likes or is readily available. Many of those perennial cool season plants are very high on the animals preferred list.) While all grazing plans should be designed to be flexible, care must be taken not deviate the graze-rest cycle to the point that those perennial plants that the plan is designed to protect and enhance are overgrazed, resulting in their loss. Cool season perennials can provide the stable nutrition that is needed for livestock and wildlife to flourish and not be dependent on supplemental feeding in winter and early spring. Protection of these plants should be of the highest priority, and over the long term will provide the rancher the opportunity to have a profitable-sustainable operation.

 

Remembering the long-term plan and the value of enhancing the growth of those deep rooted–drought resistant, soil building, highly palatable, nutritional plants, should always be a part of the priority goals of the rangeland management plan. Taking advantage of temporary growth is part of the consideration but should never be done at the detriment of a healthy-improving rangeland.

 

Engelmann Daisy one of the ‘Big Four’ of perennial forbs is getting ready to bloom. Care must be taken not to place too much grazing pressure on this highly nutritious-cool season-perennial forb. Its large deep roots offer many positive possibilities to the rangeland resource and to the success of the ranching-wildlife program.

Read the following link to get a more detailed description of Engelmann Daisy.

http://www.hillcountrynaturalist.org/pdf/150123%20The%20Big%20Four%20Native%20Perennial%20Forbs%20of%20Texas.pdfIMG_0182

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